CareerExplorer’s step-by-step guide on how to become a construction painter.

Step 1

Is becoming a construction painter right for me?

Step One Photo

The first step to choosing a career is to make sure you are actually willing to commit to pursing the career. You don’t want to waste your time doing something you don’t want to do. If you’re new here, you should read about:

Overview
What do construction painters do?
Career Satisfaction
Are construction painters happy with their careers?
Personality
What are construction painters like?

Still unsure if becoming a construction painter is the right career path? to find out if this career is in your top matches. Perhaps you are well-suited to become a construction painter or another similar career!

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Frequently Asked Questions

How to become a Construction Painter

Some construction painters learn their trade through a three- or four-year apprenticeship, although a few local unions have additional time requirements. Through technical instruction, apprentices learn how colours go together; to use and care for tools and equipment, prepare surfaces, mix and match paint, and read blueprints; application techniques; characteristics of different finishes; wood finishing; and safety practices. Unions and contractors sponsor apprenticeship programs, and the basic qualifications to enter one of these programs are as follows:

  • Minimum age of 18
  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • Physically able to do the work

After completing an apprenticeship program, construction painters are considered journey workers and may do tasks on their own. Although the vast majority of workers learn their trade informally on the job or through a formal apprenticeship, some contractors offer their own training program. There is no formal educational requirement, but high school courses in english, math, shop, and blueprint reading can be useful. Also, some two-year technical schools offer courses connected to union and contractor organization apprenticeships. Credits earned as part of an apprenticeship program usually count towards an associate’s degree.