Is becoming a medical and clinical laboratory technologist right for me?

The first step to choosing a career is to make sure you are actually willing to commit to pursuing the career. You don’t want to waste your time doing something you don’t want to do. If you’re new here, you should read about:

Overview
What do medical and clinical laboratory technologists do?
Career Satisfaction
Are medical and clinical laboratory technologists happy with their careers?
Personality
What are medical and clinical laboratory technologists like?

Still unsure if becoming a medical and clinical laboratory technologist is the right career path? to find out if this career is in your top matches. Perhaps you are well-suited to become a medical and clinical laboratory technologist or another similar career!

Described by our users as being “shockingly accurate”, you might discover careers you haven’t thought of before.

How to become a Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologist

In order to become a medical and clinical laboratory technologist, a bachelor's degree in medical technology, clinical laboratory science, or allied health technologies is the minimum entry-level requirement. These four-year programs are focused on general sciences as well as research methods and laboratory specific skills. Courses include physiology, immunology, clinical microbiology, lab management, anatomy, parasitology, and medical ethics. They also often include an internship.

It is important to enroll in a medical technology degree program that meets industry standards and is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, the Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools and The National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences.

After getting a degree, laboratory technologists can pursue professional certification (see below). Advancement to laboratory director is a relatively common career step for medical technologists, and this position usually requires a master's degree.