Is becoming a hydroelectric plant technician right for me?

The first step to choosing a career is to make sure you are actually willing to commit to pursuing the career. You don’t want to waste your time doing something you don’t want to do. If you’re new here, you should read about:

Overview
What do hydroelectric plant technicians do?
Personality
What are hydroelectric plant technicians like?

Still unsure if becoming a hydroelectric plant technician is the right career path? to find out if this career is in your top matches. Perhaps you are well-suited to become a hydroelectric plant technician or another similar career!

Described by our users as being “shockingly accurate”, you might discover careers you haven’t thought of before.

How to become a Hydroelectric Plant Technician

A hydroelectric plant technician must have completed high school or passed the general equivalency (GED) exam. Prior experience working with industrial machines and technology is also useful. Applicants to technical positions should have an associate's or bachelor's degree in electrical engineering, physics, computer science, information technology or a similar field; training as an electrician is helpful for any open positions requiring interaction with live electronics.

Hydroelectric plant technicians rely heavily on electronic equipment; applicants to these positions should be familiar with computers and, if possible, with the specific software programs the plant uses. Training new hires to use the computer equipment is a lengthy, tedious and expensive proposition; companies are often motivated to hire employees who already have some level of familiarity in that area.

A hydroelectric plant technician uses technology to communicate and learn. Records, checklists and databases can be accessed via laptop or smartphone; however, it's important to understand that water and electronics don't mix, so it may be sometimes necessary to write important notes and measurements by longhand and type them up later, far away from the water.