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Precision Metal Working is a degree category that consists of the following common degrees:

  • Welding

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    Avg Grad Salary:

    $71k

    Welding

    Welders tend to be artisans that are self-directed and independent with an interest in how things work. Due to the almost universal need for their skills, welders are in high demand worldwide.

    Welders work on all types of industrial, manufacturing, and construction applications; some even work underwater to repair oil rig foundations, ship hulls and other types of subaquatic structures. Possible careers opportunities include welding inspector, welding fabricator, welding sales representative, welding educator, welding supervisor, welding engineer, and foreman.

    Welding educational requirements vary by employer. Some employers may be willing to train individuals on the job. Increasingly, however, most prefer applicants who have a certificate or undergraduate degree from a technical school, vocational school, or community college, or have learned techniques through welding apprenticeships. Depending on the type of education, one could end up with a certificate, an associate degree, or a bachelor's degree. These programs can take anywhere from a few weeks to a few years to complete.

    Required classes in a welding program may include advanced mathematics, metallurgy, blueprint reading, welding symbols, pipe layout, and a welding practicum. Methods and techniques taught may include arc welding, soldering, brazing, casting and bronzing. Hands-on training may include oxyacetylene welding and cutting, shielded metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and gas metal arc welding.

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  • Machine Shop Technology

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    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $70k

    Machine Shop Technology

    Machinists support manufacturing industries by making and modifying metal parts. Degree programs in machine shop technology teach students about the machining industry’s production methods, materials, and processes.

    The typical curriculum includes training in:

    • set-up and operation of various machine tools
    • set-up, programming, and operation of computer numerical control (CNC) machines
    • metallurgy precision measuring, layout, and inspection
    • industrial drawing and blueprint reading
    • computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM)
    • machine shop safety procedures

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  • CNC Technology

    Satisfaction:

    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $69k

    CNC Technology