A step-by-step guide on how to become a treasurer.

Step 1

Is being a treasurer for me?

Step One Photo

The first step to choosing a career is to make sure you are actually willing to commit to pursing the career. You don’t want to waste your time doing something you don’t want to do. If you’re new here, you should read about:

Overview
What do treasurers do?
Career Satisfaction
Are treasurers happy with their careers?
Personality
What are treasurers like?

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Frequently Asked Questions

How to become a Treasurer

The United States and Canada are home to a large number of the top business, accounting and finance schools in the entire world. As such, the vast majority of gainfully employed treasurers in North America will have attended one of the best schools on the continent. These colleges and universities include the University of Texas, well known for its accounting program, and the University of Pennsylvania, home of arguably the best finance program in the entire United States. Likewise, the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management ranks among the top business schools on the continent.

Many upper echelon employers would prefer entry-level treasurers to have earned an accounting or finance degree from one of the best universities. Many employers also require four or five years of on-the-job experience in a related field such as loan auditing or financial analysis.

Requiring experience in addition to a bachelor's or master's degree is necessary due to the fast pace of the financial industry. Earning a professional certification from the Association of Finance Professionals is optional for many working in financial management, but a large number of individuals seek certification anyway. Certification allows treasurers to create an invaluable network of professional contacts as well as stay up to date on the latest government financial regulations and tax laws.