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Clinical, Counseling, and Applied Psychology is a degree category that consists of the following common degrees:

  • Clinical Psychology

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    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $47k

    Clinical Psychology

    Perhaps the best way to answer this question is to distinguish between counseling psychology and clinical psychology.

    Counseling psychologists typically work with generally healthy patients who need help to manage emotional, social, or physical issues, such as relationship problems, career challenges, or substance abuse.

    Clinical psychologists work with those kinds of patients as well, but they tend to focus on more pathological populations. In other words, they work mostly with people who have a mental illness or a psychosis – a severe disorder or disability that can incapacitate them, not merely diminish the quality of their life. Examples are schizophrenia, delusional disorder, and substance-induced psychotic disorder.

    Degree programs in clinical psychology teach students both how to observe, assess, diagnose, and treat patients and how to conduct and interpret clinical research to improve on each of those processes.

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  • Counseling Psychology

    Satisfaction:

    Very high

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $44k

    Counseling Psychology
    The counseling psychology degree helps the student explore and examine the interplay between complex human systems (cognitive, social, emotional, behavioural, and biological) to maximize learning, wellness (mental and physical), and human development in multiple settings. Students will learn to develop their professional skills in assessment, therapy, and supervision.
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  • Industrial and Organizational Psychology

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    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $78k

    Industrial and Organizational Psychology
    Industrial and organizational psychologists focus on the behaviour of employees in the workplace. They may work directly in an organization’s human resources department, or they may act as independent consultants, called into an organization to solve a particular problem. The career path to becoming an industrial and organizational psychologist begins with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. Opportunities with a bachelor’s degree alone aren’t unheard of, but they are sparse. Most students interested in becoming an industrial and organizational psychologist go on to earn an advanced degree. A person with a master’s degree is often able to find an entry-level position to launch a career. However, those with a doctoral degree will have more employment opportunities in this field.
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  • Applied Psychology

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    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $48k

    Applied Psychology
  • School Psychology

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    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $50k

    School Psychology

    Children and youth can face problems related to learning, navigating social relationships, making difficult decisions, or managing depression, anxiety, or isolation. School psychologists, with a strong background in psychological foundations and skills in diagnostic testing, assessment, and intervention, help them maneuver these challenges so that they thrive in school, at home, and in life.

    School psychology is not exclusively focused on the student, however, because by supporting students’ ability to learn, school psychologists also support teachers’ ability to teach. Degree programs in the field prepare individuals to take on this important role of helping schools improve academic achievement, promoting positive behavior and mental health, supporting diverse learners, creating safe, positive school climates, and strengthening family-school-community partnerships.

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  • Health Psychology

    Satisfaction:

    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $49k

    Health Psychology

    Health psychology, also referred to as medical psychology, is the study of the link between our mental and physical health. The approach taken by health psychologists to understand this link is known as the biosocial model, which contends that illness and health are the results of biological, psychological, and social factors.

    Biological factors include personality traits and genetic conditions. Psychological factors entail lifestyle, beliefs, and stress levels. Social factors span social support systems, family relationships, and cultural attributes. With the biosocial model as the foundation of their work, health psychologists help people change habits and adopt behaviors that contribute to good health and wellbeing. With the biosocial model as the foundation of their studies, health psychology students learn how to do the same.

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  • Family Psychology

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    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $51k

    Family Psychology
  • Forensic Psychology

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    N/A

    Avg Grad Salary:

    $46k

    Forensic Psychology

    The American Board of Forensic Psychology describes the field as ‘the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system.’ In other words, forensic psychologists work at the intersection of psychology, law, and criminal justice. They conduct defendant competency evaluations, make sentencing recommendations, evaluate the risk of reoffending, provide expert witness testimony, conduct academic research on criminality, consult with law enforcement, provide psychological services to offenders, inmates, and victims of crime, act as jury consultants, and design correctional programs.

    To prepare for careers in the field, students of forensic psychology study theories of personality, theories of criminal behavior, mental health law, the connection between mental disorder and crime, and offender rehabilitation and reintegration. They seek to understand the relationship between human psychology and all parts of the criminal justice system – legislation, law enforcement, courts, corrections, and victim services.

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